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Join the AmeriCorps Book Club!

January 23, 2012

January is Book Blitz Month – an opportunity for authors to promote with media to get their books into the best sellers list and into the hands of readers like us! As an AmeriCorps Alum, I’d like to see some of our next New York Times Bestselling Authors to be ones that are passionate about National Service and care about  Millennials leading in that movement.

After a great twitter conversation with @TerryGunnell (Arizona’s CNCS State Director) and @ChadJeremyDavis (Seattle AmeriCorps Alums Chapter Leader) about starting an AmeriCorps Book Club, I put together a list of recommended books that would be great to read as we all continue our Lifetime of Service. All the books on this list feature stories of AmeriCorps or National Service; helping us understand where Service has been and where it is going, especially as we continue to advocate to Save Service and why it is essential to fostering a stronger future for America.

See what we’ll be reading on our AmeriCorps Book Club Reading List:

The Time of Our Lives – Tom Brokaw

Why you should read it: Brokaw, former anchor of NBC’s Nightly News, looks at some of the prevalent issues affecting our Millennial generation and offers insight into how we can revitalize the American Dream through civic engagement and community. Weaving stories from his family’s upbringing in South Dakota and reflections from Americans who are change agents in their communities, he provides a hopeful vision of what our country can be, even in these hard times.

The Bill – Steven Waldman

Why you should read it: In recent years, many cuts to National Service and AmeriCorps have been debated in Congress. To understand the public policies and legislative processes at work, we’ll need to take a trip down memory lane and look at how the National Service Bill was initially passed under the Clinton administration. For those of us who aren’t as knowledgeable in the workings at the Hill, this will be a great read to help us understand what’s in motion and at stake as we continuing to Save Service.

A Call to Civic Service – Charles Moskos

Why you should read it: Moskos calls for all young Americans, between the ages of 18 – 23, to serve in some capacity in National Service to their country. Whether it be serving in day care, correctional facilities, with the poor in health, etc or in the All-Volunteer Military Force, he believes that young Americans should be giving back to strengthen their country. Sounds like something we all can relate too…

Of Kennedys and Kings – Harris Wofford

Why you should read it: Wofford, one of the founders of Peace Corps and former CEO of the Corporation of National and Community Service, recounts what can be accomplished with leaders, like the Kennedys and Martin Luther King, JR, who committed to public service and being responsible with their political powers. As the 2012 elections are coming up, we as alumni of National Service, we want to make sure that we elect a leader that will reflect, support, and implement our values.

This is just a short list and I’m positive there are other books you’d love to see on this growing list. What books would you recommend to be added in the AmeriCorps Book Club?

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7 Comments leave one →
  1. January 24, 2012 6:44 pm

    Love the book club theme. I’ll have to check out “Of Kennedys and Kings”

  2. Katie Theriault permalink
    January 26, 2012 11:21 pm

    What about “Big Citizenship” by Alan Khazei and “The American Way to Change” by Shirley Segawa? Both excellent books relating to national service!

  3. January 27, 2012 9:54 am

    Both are great books! Definitely adding it to our reading list!

    Ken

  4. Ragan Mozee permalink
    March 29, 2013 8:23 am

    This is a great idea excited to download these books.

Trackbacks

  1. Join the AmeriCorps Book Club | HandsOn Blog
  2. AmeriCorps Book Club for Kids « A Lifetime Of Service
  3. Friday Service News Headlines | A Lifetime Of Service

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